Use meal time, bath time, & car time to prepare your child for math!

Believe it or not, babies are born with brains that are ready for learning numbers, patterns, sizes, shapes, and comparisons. Using everyday moments, you can help your child build a healthy brain that’s prepared for problem-solving and math.

These simple ideas—during mealtime, car time, and bath time—can help you turn everyday moments into powerful learning opportunities! 

MEAL TIME

If you have a baby who is eating cereal or table food, count each bite as you feed them with a spoon. Using a fun, sing-song voice as you count shows your baby that counting is fun! 

As your child can feed himself finger foods like Cheerios, count out a certain number and put them in a group. “Let’s count 5 Cheerios! 1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – 5!” Counting individual items teaches your child that numbers correspond with objects.

Once your child understands that numbers represents objects, you can begin doing simple addition and subtraction. “How many chicken nuggets are on your plate? That’s right, 5. If you eat 2, how many are left?”  Or "How many carrots will you have if I give you 1 more?" They may not know the answers at first, but you can take this opportunity to point to the items and count with them. 

Have fun with patterns and shapes. Create a simple pattern such as carrot, grape, carrot, grape. Then let you child create her own patterns with finger foods. Meal time is also a great opportunity to talk about shapes! "What shape is your cracker?”

BATH TIME

Teach comparisons such a big, small, heavy and light. Having simple toys in the bathtub, such as plastic cups, is a fun way to do this. Simple conversations like these may not seem like math, but they are. 

“Which cup is big and which cup is small?”

“Pour the cup from up high. Now pour the cup from down low.”

“When you fill the cup with water, does it get heavier? When you dump the water out, does it feel lighter?”

Talk about shapes, colors, and sizes of bath toys.

Use words like over, under, down, up during bathtime. “I’m going to pour the water down your back to rinse you off.” Or “Look up as I rinse your hair.”

CAR TIME

What shapes do you see? Houses, shops, signs, the wheels on a car—they all have shapes that your child can begin to recognize!

Talk about time. “It will take us about 10 minutes to get to the store.”

Count things. Traffic lights, cows and horses, red trucks, white cars, buses. Children love to count!

Ask how many? How many wheels does that truck have? How many wheels does that car have? How many wheels does that bicycle have?

 

Here are some resources that can help you on your journey: 

  • Watch this short video for encouraging ways that real parents count, group, and compare with their little ones.
  • Follow The Palmetto Basics on Facebook and Twitter. We provide encouraging, real-life, shareable content to help parents and caregivers!

If you, your faith community, your organization, or your place of business would like to join us as a Champion for Children, contact us! palmettobasics@gmail.com.  

Thanks for sharing this post and spreading the word about The Palmetto Basics to those within your circle of influence!


10 reasons it’s important to talk with your child from the very beginning!

If you’re a parent or caregiver, have you found yourself talking to your baby as you’ve changed their diaper? Do you hear parents in the grocery story talking to their infants about what they’re buying or the things they see, even though the baby is too young to understand?

The instinct to talk, sing, and point with our babies and young children may seem silly. If you’ve been surprised to find yourself singing The Itsy Bitsy Spider while buttoning a onesie, you know what we're talking about. 

The good news is that talking, singing, and pointing with your baby or young child are actually some of the most important things you can do to build a strong and healthy brain! 

Children learn language from the moment they are born. Day by day, babies learn that sounds have meaning. Every time you talk, sing or point to what you are talking about, you provide clues to the meaning of what you are saying. Talking is teaching.

We neglect the power and significance of conversation with young children because it seems so simple. But the simplicity is what makes it so wonderful. Anyone can do this.

Researchers found that when mothers communicate with their newborns, babies learn almost 300 more words by the age of two than toddlers whose mothers rarely spoke to them.

This is why “Talking, Singing and Pointing” is one of the 5 Basics every child needs to get a great start in life. Here are 10 reasons it’s so important to talk with your child from the very beginning: 

1. You’re teaching them what communication is about, what love is about, and what relationships are about.

2. Talking to your child from a very young age is a way of constantly offering them information, and this helps them feel valued, important, and respected. 

3. Talking teaches them what conversation looks like: how to listen, how to respond, how to take turns.

4. Responding to their babbling and early forms of talking builds their confidence to express themselves with words later on.

5. The more words they hear, the more words they can use. When a child has a “language-rich” environment, they are better prepared for school and for life. Think of words as nourishment for a child’s brain!

Research shows that that “verbally engaging with babies—listening to their gurgles and coos and then responding, conversation-style—may speed up their language development more than simply talking at them or around them.”

6. Talking is more than just speaking. Pointing and singing should be used too. Pointing to what you're talking about helps to name objects for your child. When you point and sing, it also models pointing and singing for your child, which provides them with additional ways to communicate with you, even before their speaking skills are fully developed.

7. When conversation is a regular part of your relationship with your young child, it helps set the stage for the later years.

8. By asking your toddler “engaging questions,” they learn to expand their language and unpack their ideas. For example, if your child says, “There’s a doggie!” You can respond with, “Yes, that’s a doggie! What color is that doggie?” or “Why do you think that doggie has fur?”

9. Talking is an opportunity to answer the many questions your child has and helps them learn about the world. Remember, everything about the world is brand new to your young child! They ask a lot of questions because they are naturally curious and want to learn. Use their questions as an opportunity to teach them.  

10. Our words matter. They have power. Not just for healthy language development, but for emotional development. Words are an incredible way to communicate to your child how special they are, how loved they are, how valued they are. Be purposeful with your words and use them in ways that build up your child. 

  

 

Here are some resources that can help you on your journey: 

  • Watch this short video for encouraging ways that real parents are Talking, Singing and Pointing with their little ones.
  • Follow The Palmetto Basics on Facebook and Twitter. We provide encouraging, real-life, shareable content to help parents and caregivers!

If you, your faith community, your organization, or your place of business would like to join us as a Champion for Children, contact us! palmettobasics@gmail.com.  

Thanks for sharing this post and spreading the word about The Palmetto Basics to those within your circle of influence!


Caring for children requires caring for you. 8 ways to manage stress when life is challenging and unpredictable.

Children thrive when the world seems loving, safe, and predictable. With all that’s going on in the world right now, life can feel anything but loving, safe, and predictable, not only for our children but for those of who care for them.

Young children are greatly affected by the stress of their parents and caregivers. Even babies can sense the stress of a parent. With this in mind, it’s so important to find healthy ways to cope with stress as you also care for your child. Not doing so can have a lasting effect on a young child's brain, body, and emotions.

Just as your children need and deserve care and love, you too are worthy and deserving of care and love. 

Here are some practical ways to manage stress as you continue to face new challenges in daily life: 

1. Get enough rest whenever possible. Sleep is necessary for physical, mental, and emotional health and wellbeing.

2. Move your body. Whether it’s stretching, yoga, going for a walk, or doing a workout online—movement boosts our body’s happiness chemicals and releases serotonin and endorphins, which help to stabilize mood and help you feel more positive about life. 

3. Get outside. If weather allows, go outdoors. Nature provides peace and perspective, and also releases serotonin. Sunlight and fresh air are good for the body and soul.

 

4. Take breaks from media. The news, social media, and local forums have their place. It’s okay to be informed from trusted sources. But mindless scrolling and taking in too much information in a culture of fear and alarm can add to your anxiety.

5. Take a break from your phone and other devices. Put it in another room for a time. Studies show that stress levels decrease when we disconnect digitally. This will feel hard at the beginning; you might actually feel more anxious at first. But over time, this healthy habit will become life giving.

6. Stay in touch with those you love and find supportive relationships. Call or text the friends and family you don’t get to see right now. Though you may not be with others in the ways you're used to, you can still reach out in ways that bring connection and comfort. Managing stress isn’t just about healthy coping strategies. Managing stress requires supportive relationships..

 

7. Know that grown-ups need timeouts too. When you’re overwhelmed, when it’s only 11 am and the kids won’t stop fighting, it’s okay to step away and count to 100. It’s okay to leave them with your spouse or partner so you can walk around the block. Parents and caregivers need support! Don’t hesitate to ask for the help you need.

8. Practice gratitude. Studies show that gratitude actually improves mental health; it's a positive emotion that helps fight negativity. Perhaps you can begin each day thinking of 3 things you’re thankful for. If your child is old enough, teach them the practice of gratitude too!

Be kind to yourself. We’ve never been through a time like this and we all need grace and compassion for ourselves and for others. Encourage the parents and caregivers in your life. Help them in any way you can, knowing that when you do, you’re helping children too.  

We trust that normalcy will one day return. But let’s make the most of this time with the children who depend on us. Research shows that a solid foundation of love and security helps children focus, adapt to new situations, control their emotions, and begin school ready to learn. 

The Basics are 5 fun, simple and powerful ways that every parent can give every child a great start in life!

 

 Here are some resources that can help you on your journey:

  • Watchthis short video for encouraging ways that real parents are doing Basic #1, "Maximize Love, Manage Stress" in everyday life. Click on the tips at the bottom of the page for Infants 0-12 months and Toddlers 12-24 months.
  • Receive regular, FREE resources from The Palmetto Basics.
  • Follow The Palmetto Basics on Facebook and Twitter. We provide encouraging, real-life, shareable content to help parents and caregivers! And we'll post specific resources that can help you during the coronavirus pandemic.
  • If you, your faith community, your organization, or your place of business would like to join us as a Champion for Children, contact us! palmettobasics@gmail.com.

Thanks for sharing this post and spreading the word about The Palmetto Basics to those within your circle of influence! 

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How Reading and Discussing Stories Can Help Your Child Process Uncomfortable Emotions

 

Reading and discussing stories builds healthy brains in all sorts of ways. It exposes children to words, characters, experiences, places and ideas. It inspires creativity and imagination. Stories help with memory and important pre-reading skills. 

But stories are also a great tool for connecting to your child’s “inner world” in a way that regular conversation doesn’t always touch.

We all struggle with how to handle uncomfortable emotions like anger, fear, nervousness, sadness, and grief. Learning how to acknowledge uncomfortable feelings is a crucial part of growing into an emotionally healthy person. The earlier our children learn to accept and process uncomfortable emotions, the better equipped they are to handle transitions, everyday disappointments, and relationships with others.  

Books can be a simple and powerful tool to help them on their journey! Children can connect to the emotions of characters in a story in ways that help them feel less alone. They can also learn how to empathize with others and show compassion. When children see that a character in a book experiences the same fear or nervousness as them, they realize these feelings are normal.

When uncomfortable emotions present themselves, you can refer back to a story, reminding your child of how the character felt and what happened in the book.

Let stories become a jumping off point for questions and thoughtful conversations with your child. Sharing meaningful books together can also help you connect with your child on a deeper level, making them feel safe and secure. (You may be surprised by the ways they help you too!)

Here are some great lists of books for young children that can help them handle uncomfortable emotions. Your local library will have many of these titles.

Books to Help Kids Handle All Kinds of Uncomfortable Emotions

23 Children’s Books About Emotions for Kids with Big Feelings

11 Smart Books to Help Get Your Kids Ready for Preschool or Kindergarten

17 Children's Books For Anxious Kids

The Basics are 5 fun, simple and powerful ways that every parent can give every child a great start in life! 

Here are some resources that can help you on your journey:

  • Watch this short video for encouraging ways that real parents "Read and Discuss Stories" in everyday life. Click on the tips at the bottom of the page for Infants 0-12 months and Toddlers 12-24 months.
  • Receive regular, FREE resources from The Palmetto Basics.
  • Follow The Palmetto Basics on Facebook and Twitter. We provide encouraging, real-life, shareable content to help parents and caregivers!
  • If you, your faith community, your organization, or your place of business would like to join us as a Champion for Children, contact us! palmettobasics@gmail.com.

Thanks for sharing this post and spreading the word about The Palmetto Basics to those within your circle of influence!


How bubbles, balloons, blocks, and boxes can provide hours of fun for little ones!

Are you looking for indoor and outdoor ideas to keep you your child busy and active? We’re here to help!

Movement and play help young children develop coordination, strength, overall health, and school readiness. Exploring through movement and play is how little ones learn about the world; each stage of development comes with new and exciting opportunities for learning!

Hot summer weather, plus the many restrictions during Covid-19, can make it a challenge to keep little ones engaged and active without resorting to screens. We understand that it’s tempting to simply turn on the TV or the iPad instead of encouraging activities that will stimulate the brain and the body in the ways a young child needs. But we hope these simple activities will help you and your child have fun, stay active, and burn off some energy!

1. Have fun chasing balloons and bubbles!

 

Going outside with balloons and bubbles is a fun, simple, and inexpensive way to keep your young child occupied. There are so many great brain building and body-strengthening activities that balloons and bubbles can provide!

Because children can’t predict where the balloons and bubbles will go, chasing them are a great way for kids to develop gross motor skills (and burn up lots of energy!)

Kids can chase bubbles and try to pop as many as possible. While chasing them, children have to run, jump, zigzag and move in ways that require sudden shifts in balance and weight. The same is true when throwing and trying to catch or kick balloons. You can also set up a game of balloon volleyball in the yard.

* Be sure to keep a close eye when children are playing with balloons as popped balloon pieces can be a choking hazard

 Thanks to Aging With Flair, LLC for these ideas!

2. Block play

Source: www.blockfest.org

Blocks are a wonderful activity for young children for many reasons!

  • Blocks can include wooden blocks, plastic blocks, Duplos, or Legos. (Remove any extra small blocks or Lego pieces that could be choking hazards.) 
  • Blocks develop fine motor skills in fingers and hands as children learn to pick up and stack the blocks.
  • Blocks build a child’s imagination as they imagine objects to build and learn to create from that mental picture.
  • Blocks are useful for sorting objects into groups by size, shape, and color. Children can make patterns with blocks, count them, and compare them. In this way, blocks help children develop important early math skills!

For lots of ideas on block play, visit www.blockfest.org and follow them on Facebook.

3. Boxes

Empty boxes can keep a child occupied for hours!

  • Several boxes are fun to build with or to stack and knock down.
  • Boxes are great for making an obstacle course, for climbing in and out of, for jumping over, or filling up with items around the house.
  • Children can turn a large box into a house, truck, or rocket ship!
  • Provide crayons or washable markers so they can get creative with their boxes.

We hope these ideas provide fresh ideas for play during these challenging days. Know that when you put away the screens and encourage your child to engage with the real world around them, you are building a powerful brain, preparing them for school and for life! 

 

The Basics are 5 fun, simple and powerful ways that every parent can give every child a great start in life!

Here are some resources that can help you on your journey:

  • Watch this short video for encouraging ways that real parents are helping their young children "Explore Through Movement and Play" in everyday life. Click on the tips at the bottom of the page for Infants 0-12 months and Toddlers 12-24 months.
  • Receive regular, FREE resources from The Palmetto Basics.
  • Follow The Palmetto Basics on Facebook and Twitter. We provide encouraging, real-life, shareable content to help parents and caregivers!
  • If you, your faith community, your organization, or your place of business would like to join us as a Champion for Children, contact us! palmettobasics@gmail.com.

Thanks for sharing this post and spreading the word about The Palmetto Basics to those within your circle of influence!

You may also enjoy:

15 Screen-Free Indoor Activities to Keep a Young Child Busy

7 Simple Ideas for Exploring through Movement and Play (and why your child's brain needs it!) 

The Basics of Exploring through Movement and Play with Your Baby and Toddler

10 Everyday Ways Your Child Can Explore Through Movement and Play (even when it’s hot outside) 


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