The Brain-Changing Power of Talking, Singing, and Pointing During Your Baby’s First Year!

Children learn language from the moment they are born. Day by day, babies learn that sounds have meaning. Every time you talk, sing, or point, you provide clues to the meaning of your words.

We neglect the power and significance of interactions like talking, singing and pointing because they seem so simple. But simplicity is what makes them so wonderful. Anyone can talk, sing, or point when interacting with a baby or young child.

Researchers found that when mothers communicate with their newborns, babies learn almost 300 more words by the age of two than toddlers whose mothers rarely spoke to them.

This is why “Talking, Singing and Pointing” is the second of the 5 Basics.

Here are tips on everyday ways to interact with your young child at each stage of language development during the first year! *

Birth – 3 months:

Talk as you go about your daily routine –as you change her diaper, give him a bath, ride in the car, or cuddle up for feeding time. Remember, your voice is your baby’s favorite sound!  

Sing! From nursery rhyme songs to your favorite tune on the radio, singing to your baby helps stimulate the brain and make important neural connections.

Don’t worry that your baby doesn’t comprehend what you’re saying or singing. This stage is simply about exposure to language. Eventually, your baby will begin to make connections and understand that words have meaning.

3 to 6 Months:

As you continue to talk and sing to your baby, he is learning how to “talk” back in the form of coos and giggles and mimicking simple sounds.

When your baby talks, you can imitate the sound and wait for him to respond. You may discover that he tries to makes the same sound you make. If he does, smile and make the sound again. These sweet exchanges between you and your baby are the important beginnings of conversation!

6-9 Months:

Your baby may begin to say simple words like “baba” and “dada.” She can also respond to emotion. A happy voice may make her smile and an angry voice may make her appear unhappy.

During this stage, your baby can enjoy interactive games like “pat-a-cake.” (As you sing, take her hands and teach her how to pat yours.) Give her simple objects like a stuffed animal and say, “Can you pat the doggie? He feels soft.”

Look in the mirror and point to her, saying, “Who is that?” She may lean in to touch herself in the mirror. You can respond, “That’s Kate!”

Have fun during this stage as you play games, ask questions, and point to objects while naming them. Everything is brand new to your child and they love learning about the exciting world around them. Simple, daily interactions are building the brain in powerful ways!

9 to 12 Months

It’s amazing how brilliant your baby has become in just 9-12 short months. Imagine your tiny newborn. Now consider the fact that he is already communicating with gestures and simple words!

If you say “no,” your baby will stop and look at you. If you ask where someone is, he will look around to find them.” He may point to an object, curious to know what it is, or notice a favorite animal and make the sound that animal makes.

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Your baby’s language development depends on how much people talk to them. Every time you talk, sing, or point, you’re providing important information to their brains about how language works.

As your child develops, talking with them and answering their questions is a way to teach them about the world. By talking with them, you will also get to know the fascinating person they are becoming. Remember that you are your child’s first and most important teacher!

The Basics are 5 fun, simple and powerful ways that every parent can give every child a great start in life!

 Here are some resources that can help you on your journey:

  • Watch this short video for encouraging ways that real parents are "Talking, Singing, and Pointing" in everyday life. Click on the tips at the bottom of the page for Infants 0-12 months and Toddlers 12-24 months.
  • Receive regular, FREE resources from The Palmetto Basics.
  • Follow The Palmetto Basics on Facebook and Twitter. We provide encouraging, real-life, shareable content to help parents and caregivers!
  • If you, your faith community, your organization, or your place of business would like to join us as a Champion for Children, contact us! palmettobasics@gmail.com.

Thanks for sharing this post and spreading the word about The Palmetto Basics to those within your circle of influence! 

 

*These tips on early language development adapted from resources at Zero to Three.

 

 


How a Simple Bedtime Routine Can Help Your Child Feel Secure (and help you manage stress)

 

Young children thrive when their world seems loving, safe, and predictable. Little ones love knowing what to expect! 

Predictability helps them feel secure.

It's why young kids love the same books, movies, and activities over and over again! It’s also why they need consistent boundaries and guidelines. You don’t have to be an organized, “Type A” personality to create simple routines for your family. It may help to think of them as “rhythms” instead of routines.

Here are some things to keep in mind when creating a new routine:

- Routines should be realistic for you and for your family. What works for someone else may not work for you.

- Start small and simple. Establish consistency in one area before you add something new.

Not sure where to start? We recommend an early and consistent bedtime routine if you don’t have one already!

A bedtime routine helps to condition a child’s brain that it’s time to fall asleep. Your young child may be more “wired” or hyperactive when it’s time for bed or past time for bed. This is often because they are overtired. Providing a consistent, comforting, predictable routine may help your child go to sleep and even get more sleep. This makes for a happier, healthier child (and a less stressed parent.)

Here are 4 simple tips for creating a bedtime routine:

1. Say “goodnight” to screens as early as possible in the evening.  

Screens interfere with the brain’s ability to settle down and fall asleep.

2. Do your bedtime routine in the same order each night.

Over time, having an order to your routine (bath, pajamas, brushing teeth, a bedtime story) signals your child’s brain and body that it’s time to go to sleep.

3. Create a calming environment.

This is helpful whether your child is a baby or a five-year-old. Turning off screens, quieting the house, and focusing your attention on bedtime (instead of your phone or other distractions) helps your child to relax and prepare for rest.

4. Make sure part of the routine feels like a reward for your child.

Snuggles, rocking, a bedtime song, a favorite book to read aloud – these are some of the best gifts you can give your child at the end of the day. They will begin to look forward to this special time with you! And you may be surprised at how grateful you are for the snuggles at the end of the day. Bonding with your child at bedtime is a great way to do Basic #1: Maximize Love and Manage Stress.

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Routines take time to get traction, so don’t become discouraged if there’s resistance at first. This is normal. Think about what happens when you try to start a new exercise routine or eating regimen. You resist, you avoid, you procrastinate! The same can be true when you begin a routine with your child. Gradually, however, you and your child will establish and new normal.

Simple routines – for eating, playing, sleeping, etc. – are one of the ways you give your child a great start in life because they help your child feel loved and secure. Over time, they can also help you manage stress if it means you’re fighting fewer battles with your little one.

 

 

The Basics are 5 fun, simple and powerful ways that every parent can give every child a great start in life!

Here are some resources that can help you on your journey:

  • Watch this short video for encouraging ways that real parents are "Maximizing Love & Managing Stress" in everyday life. Click on the tips at the bottom of the page for Infants 0-12 months and Toddlers 12-24 months.
  • Receive regular, FREE resources from The Palmetto Basics.
  • Follow The Palmetto Basics on Facebook and Twitter. We provide encouraging, real-life, shareable content to help parents and caregivers!
  • If you, your faith community, your organization, or your place of business would like to join us as a Champion for Children, contact us! palmettobasics@gmail.com. 

Thanks for sharing this post and spreading the word about The Palmetto Basics to those within your circle of influence! 

 


The #1 Thing You Need to Know About Reading to Your Baby + 7 Simple Tips

Perhaps you’ve heard that you should read to your child from the time they’re born. It’s a way to help them develop a love for books and receive the many benefits of reading as they get older. But perhaps you’ve wondered if this is really practical. How can a baby engage with a book or understand a story? How can a baby possibly have a sufficient attention span to get through a story?

When you read to your baby, you have one primary purpose: providing a positive experience with a book.

It’s not about the story. It’s not about learning letters or phonics or making sure they’re an early reader. It’s about the experience.

When you snuggle your baby up close and they listen to the sound of your voice as you read or describe pictures, you’re exposing them to language from the very beginning. You’re promoting brain development in one of the simplest, but most powerful ways, all within the context of a loving relationship.

Here are some simple tips for reading to a child 0-12 months:

1. Focus on creating “warm and fuzzy” feelings associated with books.

Snuggle up and hold your child close so they can see the pictures and hear the sound of your voice. The early days and months of your baby’s life are filled with transitions and challenges, but stopping to read and snuggle can provide a welcome break for you too! (This is also a way to do Basic #1: Maximize Love and Manage Stress.)

2. Keep it simple. 

Sturdy board books that are short, simple, and have colorful pictures, are perfect for babies. As they get older, they will want to reach for the book and turn the pages. Board books that they’ll want to look at over and over again are a great investment. Don’t forget that your local library has these too!  

3. Speak with expression.

Whether you’re reading the words or simply pointing to the pictures and describing what you see, use an expressive voice to engage your child and make the book interesting. Remember, the sound of your voice is your baby’s favorite sound, so have fun as you read!

4. Describe the pictures and point to what you see.

With infants, you don’t need to read the words. You can simply describe what’s happening in the pictures and let them see you turn the pages. Talk about and point to the colors, shapes, and characters.

5. Let them be involved.

As your baby gets older, ask them to point to what they see in the book and let them turn the pages. Before they are even a year old, you can ask questions like, “Do you see the doggie on the page? Can you point to the doggie?” Children love to point and show you what they're learning! (This is also a way to do Basic #2: Talk, Sing, and Point.)

6. Read the same books over and over.

Babies and young children love repetition. It makes them feel safe and secure. Repetition also reinforces everyday words and concepts that are an important part of their world. Worn out books are well-loved books!

7. Follow their lead.

Remember, the number one goal during this stage is simply to create positive experiences with books. If you've been reading for a few minutes and your baby begins to lose interest, move on to something else. Every child is different and their attention spans will vary, even as they get older, but making it enjoyable will keep them excited about reading.

What are some of your favorite tips on reading to babies?

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80% of a child’s brain development happens in the first 3 years of life. Let's seize the opportunity! The Basics are 5 fun, simple and powerful ways that every parent can give every child a great start in life! 

Best of all, you can make the Basics part of your everyday family routines.

Here are some resources that can help you on your journey:

  • Watch this short video for encouraging ways that real parents are making "Read and Discuss Stories" part of everyday life. Click on the tips at the bottom of the page for Infants 0-12 months and Toddlers 12-24 months.
  • You may also enjoy 8 Simple Tips for Building a Healthy Brain with Books!
  • Receive regular, FREE resources from The Palmetto Basics.
  • Follow The Palmetto Basics on Facebook and Twitter. We provide encouraging, real-life, shareable content to help parents and caregivers!
  • If you, your faith community, your organization, or your place of business would like to join us as a Champion for Children, contact us! palmettobasics@gmail.com. 

Thanks for sharing this post and spreading the word to those within your circle of influence!  

CLICK HERE to share this post on Facebook!

 


10 Everyday Ways Your Child Can Explore Through Movement and Play (even when it’s hot outside)

 

There's a reason young children have boundless energy and are wired to move. Science shows that for a child's brain to fully mature, it needs stimulation through movement and sensory experiences. Each stage of development comes with new opportunities for learning. For example, an infant might explore by touching, grasping, chewing, or crawling. A toddler might explore by walking or climbing.

Physical activity and curiosity don't simply build a strong body; they build a strong brain! 

This is why one of the 5 Basics is “Explore Through Movement and Play.”

It’s easy to think of movement and play ideas when the weather is just right for playground fun and outdoor activities. But it’s the middle of summer...and that means it’s really hot outside for many of us! It's tempting to let TV and iPads rule the day, but there are simple ways you can support movement and play for your young child, even during the summer months:

1. Have a dance party. Turn on your favorite tunes and dance around the living room! Children love to move to music (and you may be surprised at how much fun you have when you join them.)

2. Cool off with water play. You don’t need a pool or water park to have a blast with water!

 

Children love simple activities like running through the sprinkler and having fun with containers of water. Another favorite activity is giving kids a big paintbrush and letting them “paint” letters, shapes, and designs on the sidewalk or driveway with water. Click here to see this idea in action!

An inexpensive sprinkler is another way little ones can run and play without getting too hot!

3. Walk across a balance beam. You can make one by using painter’s tape if you’re indoors. Working on balance builds a healthy body and brain during the little years.

4. Jumping Jacks and windmills. Counting while your child jumps also helps with math skills.

5. Play pretend or charades. Have your child waddle like a duck, fly like an airplane, and hop like a rabbit. Or you can let your child pretend to be something, and you get to guess.

6. Tummy time for babies. Babies need tummy time every day. When they lift their head to look around, they strengthen the upper body and prepare muscles to crawl. They also get a new view of their surroundings. 

7. Make (or have your child make) a simple obstacle course outside or inside with materials you already have. They can hop, crawl, climb, skip, or tiptoe their way through a course filled with cardboard boxes, pillows, containers, and other regular items you may have at home.

8. Everyday movement matters! When your child helps you carry in groceries, when you take the stairs instead of the elevator, when you swim at the pool or walk to the store, know that these daily activities are helping to build a healthy brain and body.

9. Switch up your outdoor play time.

While you may prefer to go to the park during the day so your kids can burn off energy, consider going in the evening or first thing in the morning so that they can still enjoy playground time.

10. Make art. Drawing, even if it's just scribbling with crayons on scrap paper, is a good way for little hands to build strong muscles and for little minds to develop creativity. Summertime is a great time to make a simple art station in your home.

What are some of your favorite ways to make Basic #4, “Explore Through Movement & Play” part of your summer routine?

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80% of a child’s brain development happens in the first 3 years of life. Let's seize the opportunity! The Basics are 5 fun, simple and powerful ways that every parent can give every child a great start in life! 

Best of all, you can make the Basics part of your everyday family routines (like the mealtime examples above.) 

Here are some resources that can help you on your journey:

  • Watch this short video for encouraging ways that real parents are making "Explore Through Movement & Play" part of everyday life. Click on the tips at the bottom of the page for Infants 0-12 months and Toddlers 12-24 months.
  • Why Your Young Child's Brain Needs Movement & Play + 7 Simple Ideas
  • Receive regular, FREE resources from The Palmetto Basics.
  • Follow The Palmetto Basics on Facebook and Twitter. We provide encouraging, real-life, shareable content to help parents and caregivers!
  • If you, your faith community, your organization, or your place of business would like to join us as a Champion for Children, contact us! palmettobasics@gmail.com. 

Thanks for sharing this post and spreading the word to those within your circle of influence!  

CLICK HERE to share this post on Facebook! 


5 Fun Ways to Turn Meal-time into MATH-time!

Believe it or not, babies are born with ready brains for learning numbers, patterns, sizes, shapes, and comparisons. Using everyday moments, you can help your child build a healthy brain that’s prepared for problem-solving and math!

Here are 5 fun and simple ideas: 

1. If you have a baby who is eating cereal or table food, count each bite as you feed them with a spoon.

Using a fun, sing-song voice as you count shows your baby that counting is fun!

2. As your child can feed himself finger foods like Cheerios, count out a certain number and put them in a group.

“Let’s count 5 Cheerios! 1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – 5!”

 Counting individual items teaches your child that numbers correspond with objects.

3. Once your child understands that numbers represents objects, you can begin doing simple addition and subtraction.

“How many chicken nuggets are on your plate? That’s right, 5. If you eat 2, how many are left?” 

"How many carrots will you have if I give you 1 more?"

They may not know the answers at first, but you can take this opportunity to point to the items and count with them. 

4. Have fun with patterns and shapes at meal-time.

Create a simple pattern such as carrot, grape, carrot, grape. Then let you child create her own patterns with finger foods.

Meal-time is also a great opportunity to talk about shapes! 

"What shape is your cracker?"

5. Teach comparisons such a big, small, heavy and light.

“Which piece of fruit is bigger? The apple slice or the strawberry.”

“What’s heavier, the banana or the apple?” 

What are some of your favorite ways to make Basic #3, “Count, Group, and Compare” part of your daily routine?

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80% of a child’s brain development happens in the first 3 years of life. Let's seize the opportunity! The Basics are 5 fun, simple and powerful ways that every parent can give every child a great start in life!

Best of all, you can make the Basics part of your everyday family routines (like the mealtime examples above.) 

Here are some resources that can help you on your journey:

  • Watch this short video for encouraging ways that real parents are making "Count, Group, and Compare" part of everyday life. Click on the tips at the bottom of the page for Infants 0-12 months and Toddlers 12-24 months.
  • 8 Simple Ways Your Child Can Become a Math Person
  • Receive regular, FREE resources from The Palmetto Basics.
  • Follow The Palmetto Basics on Facebook and Twitter. We provide encouraging, real-life, shareable content to help parents and caregivers!
  • If you, your faith community, your organization, or your place of business would like to join us as a Champion for Children, contact us! palmettobasics@gmail.com. 

Thanks for sharing this post and spreading the word to those within your circle of influence!  

CLICK HERE to share this post on Facebook! 


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